ST GEORGE'S CHURCH HISTORY

When it was part of the parish of Thornbury, which is about three and half miles away, Falfield was served by a Chapel-of-Ease, of which no records remain. It was used for Funeral Services but parishioners had to go to the mother church of St. Mary at Thornbury for Baptisms and Holy Communion.

This Chapel-of-Ease according to Sir Stephen Glynne, a well-known antiquary and ecclesiologist, who visited it in 1849, was a small building, with perpendicular features, consisting of nave and chancel. He stated that it had one unusual feature, namely, that it had no altar.
When Sir George Jenkinson came to live at Eastwood Park, around the middle of the 19th century, the chapel was in a dilapidated condition, and, mainly at his expense, and on land given by him opposite to the entrance to his park, a new church seating 180, was built in 1860.
The corner stone in the porch was laid by Sir George Jenkinson on 23rd April 1859 and the church was dedicated to St George and was consecrated by Rt. Rev. Charles Burney, D.D., Lord Bishop of Gloucester and Bristol, on 31st July 1860. The day of the consecration was apparently bright and sunny, and, flitting from rafter to rafter was a small bird, which curiously appropriate to one of the verses of Psalm 84, read in the service of consecration. “The sparrow has found her a house, and the swallow a nest where she may lay her young.”

Church Porch

In the interior of the church, an octagonal font of Bath stone standing at the west end of the building, was the gift of Anthony L.Lyster, Esq., of Stillorgan Park, Dublin, the father of Lady Jenkinson.

Font

With a view to its becoming a separate parish, a Vicarage was provided by the conversion of a blacksmith’s house and forge close by. Some of the materials of the old chapel were incorporated in it, including oak beams and mullioned windows.

The Rev. T. E. Forest was appointed to take charge of the new church, and on 12th September 1863, Falfield became a separate and independent parish, the Rev. John Pilditch becoming the first incumbent. The Vestry at the west end of the church was added in 1953, and was consecrated by Dr. C. S. Woodward, Bishop of Gloucester, on 14th September of that year. In 1960, the centenary of the church was celebrated addresses being given by the Bishop of Gloucester and many other clergy of the diocese.

Church Organ

 The organ is a two-manual instrument by Vowles Organ Builders of Bristol. The Church has one bell, which appears to have no inscription.

Although is was originally built to seat 180 people, and as recently as the 1970’s there was a substantial congregation (including a choir).

On the walls are memorial tablets erected to the memory of members of the Jenkinson family of Eastwood Park. The open-work wooden chancel screen was added in 1912. A War Memorial commemorates those of the parish who gave their lives in the First and Second World Wars. Woodward, Bishop of Gloucester, on 14th September of that year. In 1960, the centenary of the church was celebrated addresses being given by the Bishop of Gloucester and many other clergy of the diocese.

Chancel Screen
Jenkinson Mauseleum

Record of Incumbants.

Born circa 1832 in East Stonehouse, Devon

In the Census of 1861 he was the  Curate of St Mary’s Church Tetbury with his wife Mary aged 28 and daughter Mary aged 1.

In the 1871 Census  he was Curate St Mary, Walton in Gordano

Charles Tooth was born 14 February 1831 in Cranbrooke, Kent. He was the son of Robert Tooth (1799–1867) and Mary Ann Reader (c. 1801 – 1845). He married Eliza Tabberer (died 1892) in 1855.

Tooth became managing partner of the Tooth Brothers’ brewery (later Crescent Brewery) in Burton upon Trent in 1855. This was founded mainly to export beer to the business run by his brothers Robert (1821–1893), Edwin and Frederick in Sydney, Australia where demand for beer had increased as a result of the Australian gold rushes. It closed after financial problems early in the next decade.

Tooth was admitted as a fellow-commoner to Downing College in 1860 and graduated from the University of Cambridge with a B.A. in 1864. He was ordained deacon in 1863 and priest in 1864 (his brothers Arthur and William Augustus also studied at Cambridge and were ordained in the same year).

He served as curate in Uxbridge (then in Middlesex) 1863–65, was perpetual curate of St George’s Falfield, Gloucestershire 1865–71, vicar of Grandborough, Warwickshire 1871–72 and rector of St. Mark’s Snow Hill in Shelton, Staffordshire 1872–75.

Tooth moved to Tuscany for health reasons in 1876, where he was the Anglican chaplain in Siena. He founded St Mark’s English Church as an independent house church in Florence in 1877 for which he purchased new premises which opened in 1881, although chaplain and church were not licensed for service by the bishop until 1884. He remained chaplain of St Mark’s until 1894.

Tooth married Louisa Janette Anne Edwards (died 1899) in 1894. He died the same year, on 2 August 1894 in Gibraltar.

His widow commissioned the building of St Mark’s Church, Brithdir in his memory. It was designed by Henry Wilson in the style of the Arts and Crafts movement. Building started in 1895 and the church was consecrated in 1898. It is designated a Grade I listed building by Cadw who describe it as “an exceptionally important and advanced work for its date”.

Ref: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Tooth

pens. at JESUS, Jan. 28, 1856. [Eldest] s. of Gerard Noel, Esq. [R.N.; J.P.]. B. [Oct. 16, 1837], at Blatherwick, Northants. School, Rugby. Matric. Michs. 1856; B.A. 1861; M.A. 1865. Ord. deacon (Winchester)

1863; priest (Ely) 1864; C. of Tadlow, Beds., 1863-. C. of Stibbard, Norfolk, in 1866. C. of Guist, –1868. C. of Edith-Weston, Northants., 1868-70. C. of King’s Pyon with Bisley, Heref., 1870. V. of Falfield, Gloucs., 1870-6. V. of Fenny Stratford, Bucks., 1876-81. C. of Kelvedon, Essex, 1881-8. C. of St Stephen-the-Martyr, Marylebone, London, 1888-90. C. of St Margaret Pattens, London, 1890-2.

Married, June 18, 1861, Georgina Elizabeth, dau. of the Rev. William Purdon, R. of Seaton, Rutland, and had issue. Died June 18, 1897. Brother of Charles M. (1869). (Rugby Sch. Reg.; Crockford; Edw. Hoare, Hoarepens. at JESUS, Jan. 28, 1856. [Eldest] s. of Gerard Noel, Esq. [R.N.; J.P.]. B. [Oct. 16, 1837], at Blatherwick, Northants. School, Rugby. Matric. Michs. 1856; B.A. 1861; M.A. 1865. Ord. deacon (Winchester) 1863; priest (Ely) 1864; C. of Tadlow, Beds., 1863-. C. of Stibbard, Norfolk, in 1866. C. of Guist, –1868. C. of Edith-Weston, Northants., 1868-70. C. of King’s Pyon with Bisley, Heref., 1870. V. of Falfield, Gloucs., 1870-6. V. of Fenny Stratford, Bucks., 1876-81. C. of Kelvedon, Essex, 1881-8. C. of St Stephen-the-Martyr, Marylebone, London, 1888-90. C. of St Margaret Pattens, London, 1890-2.

In the 1881 Census he was living in the Vicarage at Falfield, he was aged 33. His wife Georgina was aged 34. The had a daughter Ethel aged 3 and a son Percy H aged 13 months who was born at Kings Pyon, Herefordshire and died 1965. Their daughter Ethel was run over by a horse on the A38 and is buried in St George’s Churchyard along with a stained glass memorial window in the Church.

Died 1897

Ref: Google Books

The Grave of Ethel Vilars-Hoare in St George’s Churchyard

 

Memorial window in St George’s Church to the memory of Ethel Vilars-Hoare

Reverend Edmund Juxton Wemyss Whittaker was born circa 1838 at Blackburn, Lancashire, England. He was the son of Reverend John William Whittaker and Mary Haughton Feilden. He married Frances Maria Caroline Feilden, daughter of Sir William Henry Feilden, 2nd Bt. and Mary Elizabeth Wemyss, on 19 March 1863. He died on 12 January 1918.

They had one daughter Blanche Melville Whittaker who was born in 1864 at Accrington, Lancashire, England.  She married Rear-Admiral Richard Henry Peirse on 27 April 1871 at Bath, Somerset, England.

From 27 April 1871, her married name became Peirse.

The Reverend Edmund Juxton Wemyss Whittaker was the Chaplain at St. Mary Magdalen, Bath, Somerset, England.

Ref: http://www.thepeerage.com/p40472.htm & https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Whittaker-2162

 

Census 1891 – Living in Falfield Vicarage. James was aged 57 and was born in Barford St Martin, Wilts. His wife Eliza was also 57.

The census recorded that they had a total of 6 children in the vicarage aged between 30 and 15. They also had a private Governess, Cook and Maid.

Born in Clifton, Bristol circa 1852 Died Bath 6th January 1927. His will records that he had effect of £25,413 13s. 4d. which was left to his widow, the reverend. Frank Allen clerk and Mary Fleming Allen (wife of the said reverend Frank Allen).

1901 census – Living in Falfield Vicarage. Wife Julia Beatrice Ward. Children: None Married in St Austell in 1898

They had 6 boarders, one Edwin Scott who was also a member of the clergy, Charles A Macklin who was the Schoolmaster, Fleming St John who was a nephew. Plus 3 domestic servants.

The 1911 census records that he and his wife were at Box House, Box, Wiltshire. This house consisted on 24 rooms. There were 10 boarders and a number of servants and one tutor.

The Rev. Hugh Cecil Robert Francis Jenner was born on 13 July 1872. He was the son of Hugh Jenner and Charlotte Williams. The Rev. Hugh Cecil Robert Francis Jenner married Mary Baskerville (“Molly”) Lunt on 5 July 1900. The Rev. Hugh Cecil Robert Francis Jenner died on 11 March 1968 at age 95.

1901 census – A visitor in Blackpool. Reported as a Undergraduate in Durham.

1911 census Falfield Vicarage – Aged 30 (18/12/1880) . Born Bleasdale, Lancs. Wife: Anne also aged 30 born Doncaster, Yorks. Married under one year in Suffolk

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This page was last updated on: Aug 21, 2020 @ 5:21 pm